Sport Fishing
Florida Keys
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Destin
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Clearwater
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Tampa Bay
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Naples
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Mosquito Lagoon
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Fort Lauderdale
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Sarasota
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Everglades
lakes
Lake Okeechobee
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Lake Kissimmee
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Lake Toho
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Lake George
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Kissimmee Chain of Lakes
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Crescent Lake
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Lake Walk In Water
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Deer Point Lake
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Lake Apopka
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Rodman Reservoir
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East Lake Toho
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Lake Monroe
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Harris Chain of Lakes
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Lake Panasoffkee
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Blue Cypress Lake
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Orange Lake
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Lake Lochloosa
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Lake Eustis
rivers
Indian River
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Suwannee River
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St. Johns River
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Escambia River
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Apalachicola River
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Ocklawaha River
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Withlacoochee River
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Ochlockonee River
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Choctawhatchee River
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Peace River

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Florida Everglades Fishing

The Florida Everglades are located at the Southern end of Florida in portions of; Monroe County, Collier County, Palm Beach County, Miami-Dade County, and Broward County. The Florida Everglades extend north from Lake Okeechobee to Florida Bay in the south and also features the 10,000 Islands. The area is also home to the Everglades National Park which is the largest subtropical wilderness in the U.S. The Florida Everglades consist of mostly shallow fresh water that contains billions of blades of sawgrass and features rare and endangered species and good fishing. Most anglers fish in the Everglades canals along the edges using plastic worms, soft jerkbaits, and minnow imitations. During high water in the Everglades, anglers will often enter the marsh areas where bass can be caught in the slough area. The L-67A Canal and Alligator Alley Canal have access trails off of them that are made specific for boat access to marsh areas.

 

 

 

Everglades Conservation Area 1

 

Fishing in Conservation Area 1 generally is limited to the canal system, but there's plenty of good fishing for largemouth bass, bream, and catfish. This 221 square mile portion of the Everglades is managed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, which sees to it that there is good fishing for largemouth bass, bluegill, redear, sunfish, warmouth, and catfish. Largemouth bass will hit crankbaits and plastic worms, especially during early spring. Bream go for crickets, worms, and artificial poppers. Access is at the Loxahatchee Refuge headquarters off U.S. Highway 441, Loxahatchee Refuge ramp on S.R. 80, and the Loxahatchee Recreation Area on S.R. 827 at U.S. Highway 441.

 

Everglades Conservation Area 2

 

This area consists of 210 square miles of Everglades marsh connected with perimeter canals. Largemouth bass, bluegill, redears, and warmouth are abundant along with some snook and tarpon. For bass, use plastic worms during the day and surface lures or crankbaits early in the morning or late in the afternoon. Bream bed during the warmer months and offer sport for the fly fisherman who uses sinking bugs, or to cane pole fisherman who prefer to use live crickets or redworms. Catfish are abundant also and can be lured with dead bait such as cut bait, shrimp, or liver fished on the bottom of the canals. Access points include the Loxahatchee Recreation Area on S.R. 827 off U.S. Highway 441, and the Sawgrass Recreation Area on U.S. Highway 27.

 

Everglades Conservation Area 3

 

This area covers 730 square miles of Everglades wetlands bordered by a canal system. The most sought after game fish are largemouth bass, bluegill, shellcracker, and warmouth. Most of the fishing in this area is limited to the canals along Alligator Alley, the Miami Canal, and other systems. However, when water levels are high enough, the interior of the area can be fished by airboat. Use plastic worms and live shiners in the canals for largemouth bass. Bream will bite live crickets, worms, or artificial jigs and spinners. The main access points are the Everglades Holiday Park on U.S. Highway 27, and Mack's Fish Camp on Danell Lane off Krome Ave.

 

 


Florida Fishing Trips